The Creation Wiki is made available by the NW Creation Network
Watch monthly live webcast - Like us on Facebook - Subscribe on YouTube

Golden eagle

From CreationWiki, the encyclopedia of creation science
Jump to: navigation, search
Golden eagle
145725588 e8fa4fd26f.jpg
Scientific Classification
Binomial Name

Aquila Chrysaetos

The Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the biggest and most powerful of all the many birds of prey. Before the 1950s, it was the most abundant over most of the northern hemisphere. The golden eagle makes its home in the highlands or mountainous areas. [1]

Anatomy

Wing span of Golden eagle

The golden eagle has a dark brown body and a slightly lighter brown head. Adult females are about 3 feet (1 meter) long, with a wingspan of up to 7 feet (2.3 meters). They weigh up to 15 pounds (3.8 and 6.6 kilograms).[2] As in most birds of prey, the adult male is slightly smaller and lighter, weighing between 6 to 10 pounds (2.8 and 4.5 kilograms).

Reproduction

It has been observed that non-migrating golden eagle pairs stay together year around. For the migrating golden eagle there is no information about whether they maintain year around partners.

Depending on their location, they typically breed from March to August. The female usually lays 2 eggs and sometimes up to 4. They both incubate the eggs, but the female incubate the most. Most of the eggs are white and spotted and some of the eggs are brown or reddish brownish. The eggs are not laid at one time, but instead sometimes one or two days apart. Often the older eaglet will kill the younger. Both male and female bring food to their chicks, but the male brings most of the food. After ten weeks they begin to fly by walking hopping or falling out of their nest, and after 32 to 80 days they become independent from their parents.[3]

Ecology

Golden eagle with prey

Golden eagle are normally solitary birds and they don't flock together in large numbers. In North America, they live anywhere from Mexico to Alaska. In Europe, the golden eagle can range from Scotland, through Norway to Spain. Some live in north-west Africa, and are found in Russia, and down through Asia. Golden eagles are not usually found in wooded areas, but are found in open areas of the deserts, mountains, and plateaus in the northern hemisphere.[4]

Creationwiki pool logo.png
The CreationWiki Pool has media related to
Eagles

Gallery

References