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Zoology

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Zoology is the branch of Biology that studies the animal kingdom. Aristotle is said to be the father of zoology. The word is derived from the Greek words Ζώο, zoon which means animal and λόγος, logos which means word or study.

Zoologists and wildlife biologists study animals and wildlife—their origin, behavior, diseases, and life processes. Some experiment with live animals in controlled or natural surroundings, while others dissect dead animals to study their structure. Zoologists and wildlife biologists also may collect and analyze biological data to determine the environmental effects of current and potential uses of land and water areas. Zoologists usually are identified by the animal group they study—ornithologists study birds, for example, mammalogists study mammals, herpetologists study reptiles, and ichthyologists study fish.[1]

Disciplines

Animal husbandry

Main Article: Animal husbandry

Animal scientists work in agriculture to develop better, more efficient ways of producing and processing meat, poultry, eggs, and milk. Dairy scientists, poultry scientists, animal breeders, and other scientists in related fields study the genetics, nutrition, reproduction, and growth of domestic farm animals. Some animal scientists inspect and grade livestock food products, purchase livestock, or work in technical sales or marketing. As extension agents or consultants, animal scientists advise agricultural producers on how to upgrade animal housing facilities properly, lower mortality rates, handle waste matter, or increase production of animal products, such as milk or eggs.[2]

Animal Taxonomy

The Animal Kingdom includes many invertebrate phyla and the phylum Chordata. Please use the taxonomy template for animals when constructing new animal pages.

Animal Phyla

References

  1. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09: Biological Scientists by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  2. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition: Agricultural and Food Scientists by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

See Also