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Rose

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Rose
Bella Rosa (Kordes 1981).JPG
Rosa "Bella Rose"
Species
  • R. berberifolia
  • R. persica
  • R. minutifolia
  • R. stellata
  • R. kweichowensis
  • R. praelucens
  • R. roxburghii [2]
Rosa Red Chateau01.jpg
A rosa "Red Chateau" at full bloom

Roses are species of flowering plants within the taxonomic genus Rosa. While diverse, this group is full of vibrant colors. From white, to yellow, apricot, orange, red, pink, purple, and some roses are multi-colored! These plants are just coloring the world. They can live in a vast range of climates and temperatures, they thrive in warm weather (summer or spring) but in the fall and winter, they are dormant, making their leaves red, yellow, or brown, and their stalks become weak and wobbly. Their amount of petals depend on whether they are wild, or were cultivated. Wild roses have around 5 petals, cultivated roses have around double that number. Roses are most common to the Northern Hemisphere, in areas like: North America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. No roses are native to the Southern Hemisphere. Roses have thorns along their stems to protect themselves from anything that tries to eat or damage them before the flower has produced any seeds for another generation of roses.

Body Design

Two roses growing from one stem

Roses are long, tall shrubs with stems of different sizes and shapes, but all roses have prickly thorns covering the long outstretched growth called the stem.. (Unless they were modified through genetics, or through cross breeding.) A wild rose's flower has around 5 petals, while a cultivated rose has around double that of a wild rose. A rose's size can range from 0.5 inches to (In a hybrid) 7 inches. [3]

Life Cycle

First, a rose blooms fully, and spreads pollen to other roses. But a rose's pollen is heavy, so it needs to be carried by insects.[4] Then inside it's fruit,seeds develop and are spread by humans, animals, and nature. Once planted, they absorb nutrients, and begin to sprout in about 8-12 weeks. They thrive in warm weather, and in summer, or spring. But in fall and winter, they turn dormant, their leaves change to red, yellow, or brown, and their stalks become weak and wobbly. [5]

Ecology

Roses are most commonly native to the Northern Hemisphere, including areas like: North America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. No roses are native to the southern hemisphere. Nearly all species arable to tolerate hot summers, and cold temperature down to -15c. Roses also have thorns along their stems to protect themselves from predators that try to destroy or eat the flower, before it has produced any seeds for another generation of roses. [6]

Growth and Development

Once a new hybrid rose has been chosen, it is propagated asexually with T-budding of the hybrid rose onto a vigorous rootstock (The most common method). Asexual propagation is used because the rootstock tends to be more winter hardy, (Strong against cold temperatures) and more disease resistant than the hybrid rose. Also, the newly propagated rose will receive all of the original hybrid rose's traits, along with the new ones it developed. In contrast, any seed taken from progeny will segregate and have characteristics that are different from the original hybrid rose. Rootstock plants for grafting can be propagated from a seed, but are most often clonally propagated using hardwood or softwood cuttings. In areas with cold winters, hardwood cuttings are taken in late fall or early winter. In mild climates, hardwood cuttings are taken in the fall. Softwood cuttings can be taken anywhere from early spring to late summer. The timing depends on the new growth becoming partially mature. Different rootstock plants are used depending on the utility of the hybrid rose. [7]

Video

A time lapse of a red rose blooming {{#ev:youtube|HnbMYzdjuBs}}

Gallery

References

  1. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Classification for Kingdom Plantae down to Genus Rosa L. plants.usda.gov. Web. 5-22-15.
  2. Rowley, G.D. Rosa Subgenis Rosa Species.wikimedia.org. Web. 1-3-14.
  3. The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica. Rose (plant) Britannica.com. Web. 5-11-2015.
  4. Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Office of the Gene Technology Regulator. The biology and ecology of Rosa X hybrida (Rose) Ogtr.gov.au. Web. 12-13-05
  5. Norton, Joan. The life cycle of a rose plant GardenGuides.com. Web. 5-18-15
  6. Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Office of the Gene Technology Regulator. The biology and ecology of Rosa X hybrida (Rose) Ogtr.gov.au. Web. 12-13-05
  7. Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Office of the Gene Technology Regulator. The biology and ecology of Rosa X hybrida (Rose) Ogtr.gov.au. Web. 12-13-05